Ohio Research Projects

 

List of Projects

  1. Ohio Radon Information System

  2. Development and Evaluation of Air Quality Models

  3. Mercury Removal from Flue Gas by In-Situ Aerosol Sorbent

  4. CO2 Separation and Sequestration Utilizing FGD Scrubber By-Products

  5. Abstracts of Ohio Coal Development Office projects

  6. Ohio Coal Research Consortium Projects

  7. Ohio Environmental Education Fund (OEEF, Ohio EPA)

 


Project Details

Ohio Radon Information System

Sponsor: Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Ohio Department of Health/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and                  The University of Toledo

Investigators: Ashok Kumar, James Harrell, and Andrew Heydinger

Institution: The University of Toledo

Project Period: 1986 to present

Description:  

Field studies were conducted in the 80’s to define the radon problem in Ohio. The purpose of current project has been to develop and maintain the Ohio Radon Information System (ORIS). ORIS is categorized into homes, schools and water databases. The databases have been compiled from data supplied by government agencies, university researchers, schools, and commercial testing companies. ORIS database includes measurements from 1496 zip code areas and all the 88 counties in Ohio. ORIS has the capability of generating statistics, supplying data to GIS for preparing color–coded maps, and generating reports. A Web site has been developed giving detailed information on radon and statistics of radon concentrations in Ohio. 

 Current research efforts are on upgrading the existing database and studying the effectiveness of radon mitigation systems.

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Development and Evaluation of Air Quality Models
 

Sponsor: Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Toledo Edison Company, OI-NEG, Sun Oil, Ohio Super Computer, and                  The University of Toledo

Investigator: Ashok Kumar 

Institution: Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Toledo

Project Period: 1980 to present

Description:  

Air quality models for industrial releases are being developed and evaluated under this program. Past efforts include the development of Class A model for Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Plant, acid rain models for Bay Shore Power Plant, modeling of acid rain due to Ohio sources, toxic release modeling, modifications to the ISC model for refinery applications, lead modeling from TV tube production, application of FLUENT to study downwash, and compliance modeling. Evaluation of air quality models and hazardous release models was carried out to identify the areas of strength and weaknesses in model results using different statistical indicators.

Current efforts are focused on further use of FLUENT  and evaluation of AERMOD under a variety of situations.

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Mercury Removal from Flue Gas by In-Situ Aerosol Sorbent

Sponsor: The Ohio Coal Development Office

Investigators:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

Principal Investigator:  Dr. Soon-Jai Khang, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cincinnati                                              

Co-Principle Investigator:   Dr. Tim C. Keener, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati.

Project Period: September 2001-September 2002                                                                                                                                                                       

Amount: $60,000                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

Description:  

This project proposes to develop an effective and economical method of removing mercury from flue gas utilizing the existing ingredients of flue gas with a small amount of added O3 is mixed with the gas that contains NH3 below 232 o C. The NH3-SOx reactions are fast and practically completed within the first 0.1 seconds. The reaction products are formed as small aerosol particles with the mass mean diameter less than 0.14 : m within the first 0.1 seconds and continually grow through additional reaction and coalescence. High molecular weight substances such as mercury (both metallic and ionic forms) apparently act as seeds for aerosol formation and are encapsulated/captured by the aerosol particles. The mercury-laden particles can be easily removed by conventional particle removal equipment such as an electrostatic precipitator and a bag house.

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CO2 Separation and Sequestration Utilizing FGD Scrubber By-Products
Sponsor: The Ohio Coal Development Office

Investigators:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

Principal Investigator:  Dr. Tim C. Keener, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati.                          

Co-Principle Investigator:   Dr. Soon-Jai Khang, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cincinnati

Project Period: September 2001-September 2002                                                                                                                                                                                 

Amount: $79,231                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Description:  

This project deals with a novel and inexpensive method of separating CO2 by means of using magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2).  In this process Mg(OH)2 is easily and cheaply reclaimed by power plants using magnesium enhanced flue gas desulfurization systems (ME-FGD).   The lime that is used for desulfurization contains between 3-6% magnesium oxide that may be recovered as magnesium hydroxide slurry.   Therefore, the 
Mg(OH)2 is readily available, and its production will not result in the release of additional CO2 emissions to the atmosphere.  The sequestration potential without recycle for this process is ~190,000 tons of carbon dioxide per year, and ~1,230,000 tons with recycle for every percent of CO2 recovered by the regenerable Mg(OH)2 process.  It is anticipated that the costs will be less than $10 per ton of CO2 separated and concentrated for a regenerable method with a slurry solids concentration of 20 %.

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Abstracts of Ohio Coal Development Office Projects
  The Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) co-funds the development and implementation of environmental technologies that can use Ohio's vast reserves of high sulfur coal in an environmentally sound manner. This is important to Ohio and the nation as numerous energy forecasts expect coal to fuel at least half of the U.S. electric power production through 2015 and probably beyond, while in Ohio nearly 90% of the electricity is produced from coal. Coal should be used cleanly, and this can only be accomplished through the use of clean coal technologies (CCTs).

Click here to view the abstracts:   Abstracts of OCDO  funded  projects

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Ohio Coal Research Consortium projects

The Ohio Coal Research Consortium is the university research program of the Ohio Coal Development Office. The purpose of the research is to find innovative solutions to maintain our nation's fuel diversity through the use of Ohio coal in the production of reliable and environmentally safe electric power and to further other practical uses of coal.

Click here to view the Projects

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